Sales Opportunity – Focus on Poorly Serviced Clients

When you work in sales of any type you will see prime examples of clients that are not serviced well.  It could be that they do not purchase often enough, or not in sufficient volume to rank as a priority.  That being said, they are likely to be an opportunity in waiting.

Many of those poorly serviced clients not purchasing much today can be key clients of the future.  Everything changes in business and you should not accept the status quo when it comes to clients and their business situations.  Keep in touch so you know when their business or personal situation requires your product or service.

It is interesting to note that many salespeople do not maintain regular and consistent contact with their entire database.  In most situations they will contact less than 25 clients on a regular basis.  All other clients will be relegated to the ‘call me when you need me’ process.

It has been proven that a regular 90 day contact system with all clients in your database will build greater business opportunity than just waiting for the ‘client to call’ when they want something.  After the third contact of 90 days, the client or prospect starts to see that you are really interested in them and their needs.  It is likely that they will get closer to your business and could potentially over time convert to a key customer.

So often I have seen sales and customer service situations where many clients and prospects move to another supplier simply because they felt overlooked or neglected.  That’s something to be avoided.

Here is a contact model to help your business growth:

  1. Understand who your key clients are by definition and location.  Yes they will need special attention; however that attention should be in balance with all other clients.
  2. Create a contact model for Key clients and then all others.  Key clients should be contacted at least every 30 days.  Other clients should be contacted inside 90 days regardless of their status.
  3. Use a multi faceted contact process to give your clients information about your product or service and any changes of product that they may be interested in.  The contact tools that you can use should include email newsletter, direct calls, and drop in meetings, product updates, and industry briefings.  In balance they create a good source of market and product information.
  4. Look at the competitors in your industry and identify their client base.  It is likely that you can open the contact process with some of their clients.
  5. Devote the first part of your day to contacting at least 10 new people that you have not made contact with previously.  When this is done in balance with your existing database you have a pipeline of growth.

Those clients that are underserviced will be great allies, if and when you convert them to greater levels of business.  It may take months or years to move them closer to your business, however the journey is worth it with some clients.